Faith, doubt, Atheism and Albert Einstein


From Wikipedia

Einstein had previously explored the belief that man could not understand the nature of God. In an interview published in 1930 in G. S. Viereck‘s book Glimpses of the Great, Einstein explained:

“I’m not an atheist. I don’t think I can call myself a pantheist. The problem involved is too vast for our limited minds. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn’t know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the attitude of even the most intelligent human being toward God. We see the universe marvelously arranged and obeying certain laws but only dimly understand these laws. Our limited minds grasp the mysterious force that moves the constellations. I am fascinated by Spinoza‘s pantheism, but admire even more his contribution to modern thought because he is the first philosopher to deal with the soul and body as one, and not two separate things.[6]

In a 1950 letter to M. Berkowitz, Einstein stated that "My position concerning God is that of an agnostic. I am convinced that a vivid consciousness of the primary importance of moral principles for the betterment and ennoblement of life does not need the idea of a law-giver, especially a law-giver who works on the basis of reward and punishment."[14] Author Anthony Alioto has referred to Einstein as an "agnostic theist"[15] sometimes called a form of deism or panentheism.

According to biographer Walter Isaacson, Einstein was more inclined to denigrate disbelievers than the faithful.[16] "The fanatical atheists," Einstein said in correspondence, "are like slaves who are still feeling the weight of their chains which they have thrown off after hard struggle. They are creatures who—in their grudge against traditional religion as the ‘opium of the masses‘—cannot hear the music of the spheres."[16][17] Although he did not believe in a personal God, he indicated that he would never seek to combat such belief because "such a belief seems to me preferable to the lack of any transcendental outlook."[18]

The problem I have with fundamentalism whether it be religious or Atheistic is that there is no room for doubt or mystery.  There is no acknowledgement of the readily apparent finiteness of human perception and human experience. 

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